John 1:29 Index
"The next day John seeth Jesus coming unto him, and saith, Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world."
Research Material

"The next day..."

  • That is the day after the events of John 1:19-28. Detailed and often precise chronological information is characteristic of John (John 1:29, 39, 43; John 2:1, 12; John 4:43; John 6:22; John 11:6, 17; John 12:1, 12; John 20:26). (5BC 908)

"...John seeth Jesus coming unto him..."

  • The delegation from Jerusalem had departed. Evidently they did not take John seriously, or they would have pressed their investigation further, to discover, if possible, of whom he spoke (John 1:26). The preceding day Jesus had not been identified by John's indirect reference to Him as the Messiah (John 1:26). Now He is singled out from the crowd. (5BC 908)

"...behold..."

  • What a privilege to be the first to herald (Matthew 3:1) Jesus, the One to whom all the prophets of old bore witness, as the true sacrifice! Which of the prophets would not have thrilled at the privilege! Little wonder that Jesus later spoke of John as a prophet than whom no greater had arisen in Israel (Luke 7:28). (5BC 908)

"...the Lamb of God..."

  • That is, the Lamb provided by God. John alone uses this designation of Christ, though Luke (Acts 8:32) and Peter (1 Peter 1:19) have similar comparisons (Isaiah 53:7). John the Baptist introduced Jesus as "the Lamb of God" to John the evangelist (John 1:35, 36), and for the disciple this title must have held deep significance. The figure, which stresses Jesus' innocence and perfection of character, and thus the vicarious nature of His sacrifice (Isaiah 53:4-6, 11, 12; Exodus 12:5), is reminiscent of the pascal lamb of Egypt, which typified deliverance from the bondage of sin. "Christ our passover is sacrificed for us" (1 Corinthians 5:7). By the figure of a lamb John identifies the suffering Messiah as the one in whom the sacrificial system of Old Testament times reaches reality and has meaning. In the divine foreknowledge and purpose He was "the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world" (Revelation 13:8). (5BC 908)
  • Christ was the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world. To many it has been a mystery why so many sacrificial offerings were required in the old dispensation, why so many bleeding victims were led to the altar. But the great truth that was to be kept before men, and imprinted upon mind and heart, was this, “Without shedding of blood is no remission.” (Hebrews 9:22). In every bleeding sacrifice was typified “the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world.” (7BC 932)
  • The germ in the seed grows by the unfolding of the life - principle which God has implanted. Its development depends upon no human power. So it is with the kingdom of Christ. It is a new creation. Its principles of development are the opposite of those that rule the kingdoms of this world. Earthly governments prevail by physical force; they maintain their dominion by war; but the founder of the new kingdom is the Prince of Peace. The Holy Spirit represents worldly kingdoms under the symbol of fierce beasts of prey; but Christ is “the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world.” (John 1:29). In His plan of government there is no employment of brute force to compel the conscience.... Christ implants a principle. By implanting truth and righteousness, He counterworks error and sin. (COL 77)

"...which taketh away..."

  • Or "to life up," "to bear away," "to remove." Only by virtue of the fact that the Lamb of God was without sin (Hebrews 4:15; 1 Peter 2:22) could He "take away our sins" (1 John 3:5). Because the burden of sin was too heavy for us to bear, Jesus came to life the load from our shattered lives. (5BC 908)
  • Never before was there such a general knowledge of Jesus as when He hung upon the cross. He was lifted up from the earth, to draw all to Him. Into the hearts of many who beheld that crucifixion scene, and who heard Christ's words, was the light of truth to shine. With John they would proclaim, “Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world.” There were those who never rested until, searching the Scriptures and comparing passage with passage, they saw the meaning of Christ's mission. They saw that free forgiveness was provided by Him whose tender mercy embraced the whole world. They read the prophecies regarding Christ, and the promises so free and full, pointing to a fountain opened for Judah and Jerusalem [Manuscript 45, 1897]. (5BC 1137)
  • The types and shadows of the sacrificial service, with the prophecies, gave the Israelites a veiled, indistinct view of the mercy and grace to be brought to the world by the revelation of Christ. To Moses was unfolded the significance of the types and shadows pointing to Christ. He saw to the end of that which was to be done away when, at the death of Christ, type met antitype. He saw that only through Christ can man keep the moral law. By transgression of this law man brought sin into the world, and with sin came death. Christ became the propitiation for man's sin. He proffered His perfection of character in the place of man's sinfulness. He took upon Himself the curse of disobedience. The sacrifices and offerings pointed forward to the sacrifice He was to make. The slain lamb typified the Lamb that was to take away the sin of the world. (6BC 1096)

"...the sin of the world."

  • By the singular form of the word John places emphasis on sin as a principle, rather than on particular sins (1 John 2:2; 1 John 3:5; 1 John 4:10). (5BC 908)
  • The nature of the Holy Spirit is a mystery. Men cannot explain it, because the Lord has not revealed it to them. Men having fanciful views may bring together passages of Scripture and put a human construction on them, but the acceptance of these views will not strengthen the church. Regarding such mysteries, which are too deep for human understanding, silence is golden.... The office of the Holy Spirit is distinctly specified in the words of Christ: “When He is come, He will reprove the world of sin, and of righteousness, and of judgment.” (John 16:8). It is the Holy Spirit that convicts of sin. If the sinner responds to the quickening influence of the Spirit, he will be brought to repentance and aroused to the importance of obeying the divine requirements..... To the repentant sinner, hungering and thirsting for righteousness, the Holy Spirit reveals the Lamb of God that taketh away the sin of the world. “He shall receive of Mine, and shall show it unto you,” Christ said. “He shall teach you all things, and bring all things to your remembrance, whatsoever I have said unto you.” (John 16:14John 14:26).... The Spirit is given as a regenerating agency, to make effectual the salvation wrought by the death of our Redeemer. The Spirit is constantly seeking to draw the attention of men to the great offering that was made on the cross of Calvary, to unfold to the world the love of God, and to open to the convicted soul the precious things of the Scriptures. (AA 52)
  • Paul endeavored to direct the minds of his hearers to the one great Sacrifice for sin. He pointed to the sacrifices that were shadows of good things to come, and then presented Christ as the antitype of all those ceremonies—the object to which they pointed as the only source of life and hope for fallen man. Holy men of old were saved by faith in the blood of Christ. As they saw the dying agonies of the sacrificial victims they looked across the gulf of ages to the Lamb of God that was to take away the sin of the world. (AA 424-425)
  • The sins of the people were transferred in figure to the officiating priest, who was a mediator for the people. The priest could not himself become an offering for sin, and make an atonement with his life, for he was also a sinner. Therefore, instead of suffering death himself, he killed a lamb without blemish; the penalty of sin was transferred to the innocent beast, which thus became his immediate substitute, and typified the perfect offering of Jesus Christ. Through the blood of this victim, man looked forward by faith to the blood of Christ which would atone for the sins of the world. (The Signs of the Times article "The Law and the Gospel," March 14, 1878)
  • This is our washing and ironing time - the time when we are to cleanse our robes of character in the blood of the Lamb. John says, “Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world.” ... Shall we not let Him take them away? Shall we not let our sins go? (5BC 1131)
  • There is no such contrast as is often claimed to exist between the Old and the New Testament, the law of God and the gospel of Christ, the requirements of the Jewish and those of the Christian dispensation. Every soul saved in the former dispensation was saved by Christ as verily as we are saved by Him today. Patriarchs and prophets were Christians. The gospel promise was given to the first pair in Eden, when they had by transgression separated themselves from God. The gospel was preached to Abraham. The Hebrews all drank of that spiritual Rock, which was Christ (The Signs of the Times article "Obedience Better Than Sacrifice," September 14, 1882).
  • Hanging upon the cross Christ was the gospel. Now we have a message, “Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sins of the world".... This is our message, our argument, our doctrine, our warning to the impenitent, our encouragement for the sorrowing, the hope for every believer. (6BC 1113)
  • All these heavenly beings have one object above all others, in which they are intensely interested—His church in a world of corruption. All these armies are in the service of the Prince of heaven, exalting the Lamb of God, who taketh away the sins of the world. They are working for Christ under His commission, to save to the uttermost all who look to Him and believe in Him. These heavenly intelligences are speeding on their mission, doing for Christ that which Herod and Pilate did against Him. They confederate together to uphold the honor and glory of God. They are united in a holy alliance, in a grand and sublime unity of purpose, to show forth the power and compassion and love and glory of the crucified and risen Saviour.
    • In their service, these armies of heaven illustrate what the church of God should be. Christ is working in their behalf in the heavenly courts, sending out His messengers to all parts of the globe, to the assistance of every suffering one who looks to Him for relief, for spiritual life and knowledge.
    • The church of Christ on earth is amid the moral darkness of a disloyal world, which is trampling upon the law of Jehovah. But their Redeemer, who has purchased their ransom with the price of His own precious blood, has made every provision that His church shall be a transformed body, illumined with the Light of the world, possessing the glory of Emmanuel. The bright beams of the Sun of Righteousness, shining through His church, will gather into His fold every lost, straying sheep, who will come unto Him and find refuge in Him. They will find peace and light and joy in Him who is peace and righteousness for ever (Letter 89c, 1897). (7BC 968)
  • Let the families, the individual Christians, and the churches bear in mind that they are closely allied to heaven. The Lord has a special interest in His church militant here below. The angels who offer the smoke of the fragrant incense are for the praying saints. Then let the evening prayers in every family rise steadily to heaven in the cool sunset hour, speaking before God in our behalf of the merits of the blood of a crucified and risen Saviour.
    • That blood alone is efficacious. It alone can make propitiation for our sins. It is the blood of the only-begotten Son of God that is of value for us that we may draw nigh unto God, His blood alone that taketh “away the sin of the world.” Morning and evening the heavenly universe behold every household that prays, and the angel with the incense, representing the blood of the atonement, finds access to God (Manuscript 15, 1897). (7BC 971)
  • A certain man,” He said, “made a great supper, and bade many” (Luke 14:16). When the time of the feast arrived, the host sent his servant to the expected guests with a second message, “Come; for all things are now ready” (Luke 14:17). But a strange indifference was shown. “All with one consent began to make excuse. The first said unto him, I have bought a piece of ground, and I must needs go and see it; I pray thee have me excused. And another said, I have bought five yoke of oxen, and I go to prove them; I pray thee have me excused. And another said, I have married a wife, and therefore I cannot come.” (Luke 14:18-20)
    • None of the excuses were founded on a real necessity. The man who “must needs go and see” his piece of ground, had already purchased it (Luke 14:18). His haste to go and see it was due to the fact that his interest was absorbed in his purchase. The oxen, too, had been bought. The proving of them was only to satisfy the interest of the buyer. The third excuse had no more semblance of reason. The fact that the intended guest had married a wife need not have prevented his presence at the feast. His wife also would have been made welcome. But he had his own plans for enjoyment, and these seemed to him more desirable than the feast he had promised to attend. He had learned to find pleasure in other society than that of the host. He did not ask to be excused, made not even a pretense of courtesy in his refusal. The “I cannot” was only a veil for the truth -“I do not care to come.” (Luke 14:20).
    • All the excuses betray a preoccupied mind. To these intended guests other interests had become all-absorbing. The invitation they had pledged themselves to accept was put aside, and the generous friend was insulted by their indifference.
    • By the great supper, Christ represents the blessings offered through the gospel. The provision is nothing less than Christ Himself. He is the bread that comes down from heaven; and from Him the streams of salvation flow. The Lord's messengers had proclaimed to the Jews the advent of the Saviour; they had pointed to Christ as “the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world.” (John 1:29). In the feast He had provided, God offered to them the greatest gift that Heaven can bestow - a gift that is beyond computation. The love of God had furnished the costly banquet, and had provided inexhaustible resources. “If any man eat of this bread,” Christ said, “he shall live for ever.” (John 6:51).
    • But in order to accept the invitation to the gospel feast, they must make their worldly interests subordinate to the one purpose of receiving Christ and His righteousness. God gave all for man, and He asks him to place His service above every earthly and selfish consideration. He cannot accept a divided heart. The heart that is absorbed in earthly affections cannot be given up to God. The lesson is for all time. (COL 221-223)
  • When one turns away from human imperfections to behold Jesus, a divine transformation takes place in the character. The Spirit of Christ working upon the heart conforms it to His image. Then let it be your effort to lift up Jesus. Let the mind's eye be directed to “the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world.” (John 1:29). And as you engage in this work, remember that “he which converteth the sinner from the error of his way, shall save a soul from death, and shall hide a multitude of sins.” (James 5:20). (COL 250-251)