Galatians 2:20 Index
"I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me."
Bibliography

" . . . Crucified with Christ . . . "

  • That is, Paul had accepted the atonement provided by Christ's death upon the cross (Romans 6:3-11; Philippians 3:8; Philippians 3:9; Philippians 3:10). He considered himself as dead to sin, to the world, and to man-devised methods of attaining to righteousness, as if he had actually been crucified. These methods no longer appealed to him, and in his heart there was no response to them. (6BC 951)

" . . . nevertheless I live . . . "

  • The Greek translated "nevertheless I live; yet not I" (Galatians 2:20), may also be rendered, "it is no longer I who live."Both are appropriate to the context, and either way the sense of the statement as a whole is unchanged. (6BC 951)
  • While dead to some things, Paul was very much alive to others. He was as active after conversion as he was before, for the life of a Christian is not one of inactivity. Jesus spoke of this new life as a more abundant life (John 10:10). Since Jesus is the source of life, there can be no true appreciation of life apart from Him. (6BC 951)
  • Paul realized that his sufficiency was not in himself, but in the presence of the Holy Spirit, whose gracious influence filled his heart, bringing every thought into subjection to Christ. He spoke of himself as “always bearing about in the body the dying of the Lord Jesus, that the life also of Jesus might be made manifest in our body” (2 Corinthians 4:10). In the apostle's teachings Christ was the central figure. “I live,” he declared, “yet not I, but Christ liveth in me” (Galatians 2:20). Self was hidden; Christ was revealed and exalted. (AA 251)

" . . . Christ liveth in me . . . "

  • This is the secret of a successful Christian life -- Christ abiding within and living out in us the same perfect life that He lived here on earth. The love of Christ constrains him (2 Corinthians 5:14), and the righteousness of Christ becomes a reality in his life. (Romans 8:3; Romans 8:4). (6BC 951)
  • Not lip service, not profession, but humble, devoted lives, is that for which God is seeking. Teachers and students are to know by experience what it means to live consecrated lives, which reveal the sacred principles that are the basis of Christian character. Those who give themselves to learn the way and will of God are receiving the highest education that it is possible for mortals to receive. They are building their experience, not on the sophistries of the world, but upon principles that are eternal.
    • It is the privilege of every student to take the life and teachings of Christ as his daily study. Christian education means the acceptance, in sentiment and principle, of the teachings of the Saviour. It includes a daily, conscientious walking in the footsteps of Christ, who consented to come to the world in the form of humanity, that He might give to the human race a power that they could gain by no other means. What was that power? The power to take the teachings of Christ and follow them to the letter.
    • In His resistance of evil and His labor for others, Christ gave to men an example of the highest education. He revealed God to His disciples in a way that wrought in their hearts a special work, such as He has long been urging us to allow Him to do in our hearts. There are many who in dwelling so largely on theory have lost sight of the living power of the Saviour's example. They have lost sight of Him as the self-denying, humble worker. What they need is to behold Jesus. Daily they need the fresh revealing of His presence. They need to follow more closely His example of self-renunciation and sacrifice.
    • We need the experience that Paul had when he wrote, “I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I,but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave Himself for me” (Galatians 2:20).
    • The knowledge of God and of Jesus Christ expressed in character is the very highest education. It is the key that opens the portals of the heavenly city. This knowledge it is God's purpose that all who put on Christ shall possess. (CT 35-37)
  • Are you a follower of Christ? Then all that is written concerning the spiritual life is written for you, and may be attained through uniting yourself to Jesus. Is your zeal languishing? has your first love grown cold? Accept again of the proffered love of Christ. Eat of His flesh, drink of His blood, and you will become one with the Father and with the Son.
    • The unbelieving Jews refused to see any except the most literal meaning in the Saviour's words. By the ritual law they were forbidden to taste blood, and they now construed Christ's language into a sacrilegious speech, and disputed over it among themselves. Many even of the disciples said, “This is an hard saying; who can hear it?” (John 6:60).
    • The Saviour answered them: “Doth this offend you (John 6:61)? What and if ye shall see the Son of man ascend up where He was before (John 6:62)? It is the spirit that quickeneth; the flesh profiteth nothing: the words that I speak unto you, they are spirit, and they are life” (John 6:63).
    • The life of Christ that gives life to the world is in His word. It was by His word that Jesus healed disease and cast out demons; by His word He stilled the sea, and raised the dead; and the people bore witness that His word was with power. He spoke the word of God, as He had spoken through all the prophets and teachers of the Old Testament. The whole Bible is a manifestation of Christ, and the Saviour desired to fix the faith of His followers on the word. When His visible presence should be withdrawn, the word must be their source of power. Like their Master, they were to live “by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God” (Matthew 4:4).
    • As our physical life is sustained by food, so our spiritual life is sustained by the word of God. And every soul is to receive life from God's word for himself. As we must eat for ourselves in order to receive nourishment, so we must receive the word for ourselves. We are not to obtain it merely through the medium of another's mind. We should carefully study the Bible, asking God for the aid of the Holy Spirit, that we may understand His word. We should take one verse, and concentrate the mind on the task of ascertaining the thought which God has put in that verse for us. We should dwell upon the thought until it becomes our own, and we know “what saith the Lord.”
    • In His promises and warnings, Jesus means me. God so loved the world, that He gave His only-begotten Son, that I by believing in Him, might not perish, but have everlasting life. The experiences related in God's word are to be my experiences. Prayer and promise, precept and warning, are mine. “I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave Himself for me” (Galatians 2:20). As faith thus receives and assimilates the principles of truth, they become a part of the being and the motive power of the life. The word of God, received into the soul, molds the thoughts, and enters into the development of character.
    • By looking constantly to Jesus with the eye of faith, we shall be strengthened. God will make the most precious revelations to His hungering, thirsting people. They will find that Christ is a personal Saviour. As they feed upon His word, they find that it is spirit and life. The word destroys the natural, earthly nature, and imparts a new life in Christ Jesus. The Holy Spirit comes to the soul as a Comforter. By the transforming agency of His grace, the image of God is reproduced in the disciple; he becomes a new creature. Love takes the place of hatred, and the heart receives the divine similitude. This is what it means to live “by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God” (Matthew 4:4). This is eating the Bread that comes down from heaven. (DA 389-391)
  • Not by the decisions of courts or councils or legislative assemblies, not by the patronage of worldly great men, is the kingdom of Christ established, but by the implanting of Christ's nature in humanity through the work of the Holy Spirit. “As many as received Him, to them gave He power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on His name (John 1:12): which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God” (John 1:13). Here is the only power that can work the uplifting of mankind. And the human agency for the accomplishment of this work is the teaching and practicing of the word of God.
    • When the apostle Paul began his ministry in Corinth, that populous, wealthy, and wicked city, polluted by the nameless vices of heathenism, he said, “I determined not to know anything among you, save Jesus Christ, and Him crucified”  (1 Corinthians 2:2). Writing afterward to some of those who had been corrupted by the foulest sins, he could say, “But ye are washed, but ye are sanctified, but ye are justified in the name of the Lord Jesus, and by the Spirit of our God” (1 Corinthians 6:11). “I thank my God always on your behalf, for the grace of God which is given you by Jesus Christ” (1 Corinthians 1:4).
    • Now, as in Christ's day, the work of God's kingdom lies not with those who are clamoring for recognition and support by earthly rulers and human laws, but with those who are declaring to the people in His name those spiritual truths that will work in the receivers the experience of Paul: “I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me” (Galatians 2:20). Then they will labor as did Paul for the benefit of men. He said, “Now then we are ambassadors for Christ, as though God did beseech you by us: we pray you in Christ's stead, be ye reconciled to God” (2 Corinthians 5:20). (DA 509-510)
  • He who beholds Christ in His self-denial, His lowliness of heart, will be constrained to say, as did Daniel, when he beheld One like the sons of men, “My comeliness was turned in me into corruption” (Daniel 10:8). The independence and self-supremacy in which we glory are seen in their true vileness as tokens of servitude to Satan. Human nature is ever struggling for expression, ready for contest; but he who learns of Christ is emptied of self, of pride, of love of supremacy, and there is silence in the soul. Self is yielded to the disposal of the Holy Spirit. Then we are not anxious to have the highest place. We have no ambition to crowd and elbow ourselves into notice; but we feel that our highest place is at the feet of our Saviour. We look to Jesus, waiting for His hand to lead, listening for His voice to guide. The apostle Paul had this experience, and he said, “I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave Himself for me” (Galatians 2:20).
    • When we receive Christ as an abiding guest in the soul, the peace of God, which passeth all understanding, will keep our hearts and minds through Christ Jesus. The Saviour's life on earth, though lived in the midst of conflict, was a life of peace. While angry enemies were constantly pursuing Him, He said, “He that sent Me is with Me: the Father hath not left Me alone; for I do always those things that please Him” (John 8:29). No storm of human or satanic wrath could disturb the calm of that perfect communion with God. And He says to us, “Peace I leave with you, My peace I give unto you” (John 14:27). “Take My yoke upon you, and learn of Me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest” (Matthew 11:29). Bear with Me the yoke of service for the glory of God and the uplifting of humanity, and you will find the yoke easy and the burden light.
    • It is the love of self that destroys our peace. While self is all alive, we stand ready continually to guard it from mortification and insult; but when we are dead, and our life is hid with Christ in God, we shall not take neglects or slights to heart. We shall be deaf to reproach and blind to scorn and insult. “Love suffereth long, and is kind; love envieth not; love vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up (1 Corinthians 13:4, R.V.), doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not its own, is not provoked, taketh not account of evil (1 Corinthians 13:5, R.V.); rejoiceth not in unrighteousness, but rejoiceth with the truth (1 Corinthians 13:6, R.V.); beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things (1 Corinthains 13:7, R.V.). Love never faileth” 1 Corinthians 13:8, R.V.).
    • Happiness drawn from earthly sources is as changeable as varying circumstances can make it; but the peace of Christ is a constant and abiding peace. It does not depend upon any circumstances in life, on the amount of worldly goods or the number of earthly friends. Christ is the fountain of living water, and happiness drawn from Him can never fail. (MB 15-16)
  • No one can occupy a neutral position; there is no middle class, who neither love God nor serve the enemy of righteousness. Christ is to live in His human agents and work through their faculties and act through their capabilities. Their will must be submitted to His will; they must act with His Spirit. Then it is no more they that live, but Christ that lives in them. He who does not give himself wholly to God is under the control of another power, listening to another voice, whose suggestions are of an entirely different character. Half-and-half service places the human agent on the side of the enemy as a successful ally of the hosts of darkness. When men who claim to be soldiers of Christ engage with the confederacy of Satan, and help along his side, they prove themselves enemies of Christ. They betray sacred trusts. They form a link between Satan and the true soldiers, so that through these agencies the enemy is constantly working to steal away the hearts of Christ's soldiers. (MB 94)

" . . . in the flesh . . . "

  • That is, this present life. The Christian is still in the world, though not of it (John 17:11; John 17:14). (6BC 951)

" . . . faith of the Son of God . . . "

  • That is, faith in the Son of God. Important textual evidence may be cited for reading "faith in God and Christ." (6BC 951).

" . . . who loved me . . . "

  • Looking toward the woman, Christ insisted on knowing who had touched Him. Finding concealment vain, she came forward trembling, and cast herself at His feet. With grateful tears she told Him, before all the people, why she had touched His garment, and how she had been immediately healed. She feared that her act in touching His garment had been one of presumption; but no word of censure came from Christ's lips. He spoke only words of approval. They came from a heart of love, filled with sympathy for human woe. “Daughter,” He said gently, “be of good comfort: thy faithhath made thee whole; go in peace” (Luke 8:48). How cheering were these words to her. Now no fear that she had given offense embittered her joy.
    • To the curious crowd pressing about Jesus there was imparted no vital power. But the suffering woman who touched Him in faith received healing. So in spiritual things does the casual contact differ from the touch of faith. To believe in Christ merely as the Saviour of the world can never bring healing to the soul. The faith that is unto salvation is not a mere assent to the truth of the gospel. True faith is that which receives Christ as a personal Saviour. God gave His only-begotten Son, that I, by believing in Him, “should not perish, but have everlasting life” (John 3:16). When I come to Christ, according to His word, I am to believe that I receive His saving grace. The life that I now live, I am to ***** “live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave Himself for me.” Galatians 2:20. (MH 62)*****