Daniel 11:17 Index
"He shall also set his face to enter with the strength of his whole kingdom, and upright ones with him; thus shall he do: and he shall give him the daughter of women, corrupting her: but she shall not stand on his side, neither be for him."
Research Material

"He shall also set his face..."

  • Rome was beginning to exercise her strength when Ptolemy XI, king of Egypt, died in 51 B.C. He placed his two children, Cleopatra and Ptolemy XII, under the guardian ship of Rome. Just three years later Cleopatra became the mistress of Julius Caesar. Daniel 11:17-20 tell how Julius Caesar took his campaign to the coast lands and was assassinated in 44 B.C. Cleopatra didn't stand with Caesar, but turned her affections to Mark Anthony. (KC 130-131)

"...and upright ones with him..."

  • Ptolemy XI Auletes died in 51 B.C., he placed his two children, Cleopatra and Ptolemy XII, under the guardianship of Rome. (4BC 869)

"...and he shall give him the daughter of women..."

  • An unusual expression... emphasizing the femininity of the women referred to... Cleopatra, the daughter of Ptolemy XI placed under Roman guardianship in 51 B.C., and... (4BC 869-870)

"...corrupting her..."

  • ...three years later became the mistress of Julius Cesar, who had invaded Egypt. (4BC 870)

"...but she shall not stand on his side..."

  • Cleopatra's devious career fits welll the specifications of this clause... for Cleopatra did not stand for Caesar, but for her own political interests. After Julius Caesar was assassinated, Cleopatra turned her affections to Mark Antony, the rival of Caesar's heir, Octavian. Octavian (later Augustus) defeated the combined forces of Cleopatra and Antony at Actium (31 B.C.). The next year Antony's suicide (said by some to have been engineered by Cleopatra) opened the way for the new victor. (4BC 870)

"...neither be for him."

  • Then Cleopatra, finding that she could not ingratiate herself with Octavian, committed suicide.... With Cleopatra the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt ended, and from 30 B.C., onward Egypt was a province of the Roman Empire. (4BC 870)