Daniel 4:34 Index
"And at the end of the days I Nebuchadnezzar lifted up mine eyes unto heaven, and mine understanding returned unto me, and I blessed the most High, and I praised and honoured him that liveth for ever, whose dominion is an everlasting dominion, and His kingdom is from generation to generation:"
Research Material

"...at the end of days..."

  • That is, the end of the "seven times," or seven years, predicted for the continuation of Nebuchadnezzar's madness. (Daniel 4:16). (4BC 793)
  • At the end of seven years God removed the hand of affliction, and the reason and understanding of the king returned to him. His first act was to bless the Most High. On this Matthew Henry makes the following appropriate remark:
    • "Those may justly be reckoned void of understanding that do not bless and praise God; nor do men ever rightly use their reason till they begin to be religious, nor live as men till they live to the glory of God." (Matthew Henry, Commentary, Vol. II, page 965, note on Daniel 4:34-37) (US 85-86)
  • For seven years Nebuchadnezzar, in his degradation, was an astonishment to all his subjects. For seven years he was humbled before the world, as a punishment for ascribing to himself the glory that belonged to God. At the end of this time his reason was restored to him. Through his terrible humiliation he was brought to see his own weakness, and to acknowledge the supremacy of God. (The Youth's Instructor article "Nebuchadnezzar's Restoration" December 13, 1904)
  • Nebuchadnezzar, through his terrible humiliation in the loss of his reason, was brought to see his own weakness, and to acknowledge the supremacy of the living God. (3MR 186)
  • For seven years Nebuchadnezzar was an astonishment to all his subjects; for seven years he was humbled before all the world. Then his reason was restored and, looking up in humility to the God of heaven, he recognized the divine hand in his chastisement. In a public proclamation he acknowledged his guilt and the great mercy of God in his restoration. (Daniel 4:34-37). (PK 520-521)

"...I Nebuchadnezzar lifted up mine eyes unto heaven..."

  • It is significant to notice that the return of reason is said to have come to the king with his recognition of the true God. When the humbled king prayerfully looked up to heaven he was elevated from the condition of a brute beast to that of a being bearing the image of God. The one who for years had helplessly lain on the ground in his debasement was one more lifted up to the dignity of manhood which God has granted His creatures formed after His likeness. The essential feature of the miracle that occurred in Nebuchadnezzar's case is still repeated -- even if in a less spectacular manner -- in the conversion of every sinner. (4BC 793)
  • But at the end of the assigned period, he tells us, when his reason returned to him, he lifted up his eyes to heaven and "blessed the Most High." (MM 61)

"...I blessed the most High..."

  • It speaks well for the once proud king, that after his dreadful experience his first desire was to thank God, to praise Him as the ever living One, and to recognize the eternity of His rulership. (4BC 793)
  • Thus the king upon the Babylonian throne became a witness for God, giving his testimony, warm and eloquent, from a grateful heart that was partaking of the mercy and grace, the righteousness and peace, of the divine nature. God's design that the greatest kingdom of the world should show forth his praise, was now fulfilled. The public proclamation in which Nebuchadnezzar acknowledged his guilt and the great mercy of God in his restoration, is the last act of his life as recorded in Sacred History. (The Youth's Instructor article "Nebuchadnezzar's Restoration" December 13, 1904)